Michelle. Lover of writing, reading, feminism, history, law, art, make-up.
And sleeping. And a lot of eating. Mostly ice cream.
  • jean-luc-gohard:

    spiderkiss:

    poppypicklesticks:

    maraudere:

    Josh Thomas talks about male suicide

    I wonder how feminists will react to this

    Probably ignore it then go back to making male tears mugs and gifs 

    Actually this is a very common idea among feminists

    It’s something feminists have been talking about for years it’s called toxic masculinity and it’s one of the common threads among the topic of ‘Patriarchy hurts men too’. In fact the first time I read about toxic masculinity was on a feminist blog.

    If you actually read things feminists talk about instead of straw manning them you might know this but OH WELL

    Toxic masculinity is real and is really a problem and all that, but the suicide statistics are pretty misleading. Women attempt suicide more often, but tend to use methods like overdose rather than firearms. Men attempt suicide less often but succeed more often. And instead of taking women’s attempts seriously, they’re often written off as cries for help.

    Which is something I’ve never really understood, to be honest. If something is a cry for help, why would you go, “Oh, don’t worry about them, it’s just a cry for help,” rather than helping them? If I’m crying out for help, it’s because I need help!

    (via stfueverything)

  • loki-has-a-tardis:

    This is honestly the best poster I have found in a while supporting breast cancer awareness. I am honestly so sick of seeing, “set the tatas free” and “save the boobies”. There is no reason in hell a life threatening, life ruining disease should be sexualized. “Don’t wear a bra day,” go fuck yourselves. You’re not saving a pair of tits, you’re saving the entire package: mind, body, and soul included. Women are not just a pair of breasts.

    (via iwriteaboutfeminism)

  • "Let’s examine a traditionally male-dominated role that is very well-respected, and well-paid, in many parts of the world—that of a doctor. In the UK, it is listed as one of the top ten lucrative careers, and the average annual income of a family doctor in the US is well into six figures. It also confers on you significant social status, and a common stereotype in Asian communities is of parents encouraging their children to become doctors.

    One of my lecturers at university once presented us with this thought exercise: why are doctors so highly paid, and so well-respected? Our answers were predictable. Because they save lives, their skills are extremely important, and it takes years and years of education to become one. All sound, logical reasons. But these traits that doctors possess are universal. So why is it, she asked, that doctors in Russia are so lowly paid? Making less than £7,500 a year, it is one of the lowest paid professions in Russia, and poorly respected at that. Why is this?

    The answer is crushingly, breathtakingly simple. In Russia, the majority of doctors are women. Here’s a quote from Carol Schmidt, a geriatric nurse practitioner who toured medical facilities in Moscow: “Their status and pay are more like our blue-collar workers, even though they require about the same amount of training as the American doctor… medical practice is stereotyped as a caring vocation ‘naturally suited‘ to women, [which puts it at] a second-class level in the Soviet psyche.”

    What this illustrates perfectly is this—women are not devalued in the job market because women’s work is seen to have little value. It is the other way round. Women’s work is devalued in the job market because women are seen to have little value."
  • mermaidskey:

    hemipelagicdredger:

    mermaidskey:

    mermaidskey:

    oxidoreductase:

    Lavoisier is having none of your shit.

    Heeeey so fun fact: the woman in that painting is Lavoisier’s wife, Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze, who not only acted as Lavoisier’s lab assistant but also translated English and Latin texts into French so he could read them. But she didn’t just translate, she pointed out errors in the chemistry in some of the texts. Her observations of these errors convinced Lavoisier to study combustion, which led to his discovery of oxygen. She was also critical to the publication of Lavoisier’s Elementary Treatise on Chemistry in 1789. She kept strict records of every experiment they conducted together and drew detailed diagrams of all their equipment. She also threw amazing parties and invited all the brightest minds in science so her husband could pick their brains. After Lavoisier was guillotined she secured all of his notebooks and equipment for posterity.

    In short: NOBODY KICKS MADAME LAVOISIER OUT OF THE LAB.

    Also, a side note: My historian husband-to-be pointed some things out to me about this painting. Notice that Madame Lavoisier is looking at the viewer, and all the light is on her, while Lavoisier himself is physically smaller than her, in shadow, and looking up to her in reverence. This isn’t a candid photograph- all of these choices are deliberate. The painting isn’t of Lavoisier- Madame Lavoisier is meant to be the central subject. 

    I can just imagine Lavoisier telling all his colleagues that his wife is really the one with all the clever ideas, and them patting him on the back and telling him he’s sweet for saying so.

    more like

    image

    I LOVE IT

    (via therougemaiden)

  • Why it’s so hard for men to see misogyny (via ethiopienne)

    BOOOM.  Read this if you are a dude, please.

    (via geekyjessica)

    Yesssssss.

    (via quothtehblackbirdnevermoar)

    Its hard for men to understand why women dont get loud & angry because they havent spent their entire lives being reprimanded whenever they take up too much space. (via pluralfloral)

    (via therougemaiden)

  • "These are forms of male aggression that only women see. But even when men are afforded a front seat to harassment, they don’t always have the correct vantage point for recognizing the subtlety of its operation. Four years before the murders, I was sitting in a bar in Washington, D.C. with a male friend. Another young woman was alone at the bar when an older man scooted next to her. He was aggressive, wasted, and sitting too close, but she smiled curtly at his ramblings and laughed softly at his jokes as she patiently downed her drink. ‘Why is she humoring him?’ my friend asked me. ‘You would never do that.’ I was too embarrassed to say: ‘Because he looks scary’ and ‘I do it all the time.’

    Women who have experienced this can recognize that placating these men is a rational choice, a form of self-defense to protect against setting off an aggressor. But to male bystanders, it often looks like a warm welcome, and that helps to shift blame in the public eye from the harasser and onto his target, who’s failed to respond with the type of masculine bravado that men more easily recognize."
  • webbgirl34:

    thebigsisteryouneveraskedfor:

    Gisella Perl was forced to work as a doctor in Auschwitz concentration camp during the holocaust.

    She was ordered to report ever pregnant women do the physician Dr. Josef Mengele, who would then use the women for cruel experiments (e.g. vivisections) before killing them.

    She saved hundreds of women by performing abortions on them before their pregnancy was discovered, without having access to basic medical supplies. She became known as the “Angel of Auschwitz”.

    After being rescued from Bergen-Belsen concentration camp she tried to commit suicide, but survived, recovered and kept working as a gynecologist, delivering more than 3000 babies.

    I want to nail this to the forehead of every anti-abortionist who uses the word “Holocaust” when talking about legal abortions.

    (via fuckyeahwomenprotesting)